UEFA Euro Winners 2022: List of All European Champions & Runner Ups

Ahead of England vs Italy historic Euro 2022 final, here are the Euro winners list.

England creates history with a thrilling win over Denmark to battle against Italy in the Euro 2022 final. The three lions reach the European Championship final after 55 years beating Denmark 2-1 in extra time. Football across the world are now wondering who will win the Euro cup? Well, it isn’t easy to guess, but ahead of the grand finale. Let’s take a look at all the winners of the UEFA Euro along with runner ups list.

The European Championship, formally UEFA European Championship, also called Euro is the leading association football competition played by the senior men’s national teams of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), deciding the continental champion of Europe. UEFA Euros is the second most-watched football tournament after the FIFA World Cup.

A total of 15 tournaments have been organised, and nine countries have won the competition: Spain and Germany with three titles and France has emerged twice as the UEFA Euro winners. In contrast, Portugal, Italy, Denmark, Netherlands, the Soviet Union, Greece and Czechoslovakia have one title each. Spain is the only country to win the title back to back, in 2008 and 2012. READ: Euro 2022 Live Stream

UEFA Euro Winners List

In the last UEFA Euro championship, in 2016 hosted by France, was won by Portugal at the Stade the France stadium after extra time. The final attracted 284 million viewers, which is the second most-viewed game in the history of all European tournaments.

UEFA Euro Winners List 2022

YearHostWinnerScoreRunner-up
2021EuropeTBCTBCTBC
2016FrancePortugal1–0France
2012Poland & UkraineSpain4-0Italy
2008Austria & SwitzerlandSpain1-0Germany
2004PortugalGreece1-0Portugal
2000Belgium & NetherlandsFrance2-1 Italy
1996EnglandGermany2-1Czech Republic
1992SwedenDenmark2-0Germany
1988West GermanyNetherlands2-0Soviet Union
1984FranceFrance2-0Spain
1980ItalyWest Germany2-1Belgium
1976YugoslaviaCzechoslovakia2-2 / (5-3)West Germany
1972BelgiumWest Germany3-0Soviet Union
1968ItalyItaly1-1 / 2-0Yugoslavia
1964SpainSpain2-1Soviet Union
1960FranceSoviet Union2-1Yugoslavia

Note: aet = after extra time, asdet =after sudden death extra time and ps = after penalty shootout

History of Euro Winners

The 1960 tournament, carried in France, had four teams contending in the finals out of 17 that embarked. The tournament was first won by the Soviet Union, beating Yugoslavia 2–1 in a tight final in Paris. Spain withdrew from their quarter-final match against the USSR because of political protests. Out of the 17 teams that reached the qualifying tournament, noteworthy absentees we’re the Netherlands, England, Italy and West Germany.

UEFA European Championship Expanded to 8 teams.

The competition was further extended to eight participating teams in the 1980 tournament, hosted by Italy for the second time after 1968. It comprised a group stage, the winners of the groups going on to compete in the final, and the runners-up to play in the third-place play-off. West Germany achieved its second European title by winning against Belgium 2–1.

Euro Expanded to 16 teams

The total number of teams contesting in the tournament doubled to 16 in Euro 1996, hosted by England. It was the first tournament to use the terminology “Euro [year]” ] the Final was between the just formed Czech Republic and was decided by the very first golden goal ever in a major tournament, scored by Oliver Bierhoff from Germany. It was Germany’s first title as a unified nation.

European Championship Expanded to 24 teams

After substantial debate and voting, UEFA announced that Euro 2016 would be the first instance of 24 teams playing in the finals(after UEFA Euro Qualifiers), which France will host.

Portugal, which qualified for the knock-out stage even though finishing third in its group, went on to win the championship by beating extremely favoured host team France 1–0 in the final match, thanks to a goal scored by Eder in the 109th minute. It was the first time Portugal won a major tournament.

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